Auction

A silent auction will be held at the 2019 Olde South Ball. A portion of the proceeds benefit Calvary Home for Children in Anderson, SC. 

 We thank our donors for donating these special items for the 2019 auction!


The Battle of Gettysburg: Repulse of Longstreet’s Assault, July 3, 1863, by James Walker

Donated by the Confederate Museum

Six years in the making, James Walker’s twenty-foot long The Battle of Gettysburg debuted in Boston on March 14, 1870. No less than five major Boston newspapers lauded the work’s sweep and substance, praising its “remarkable minuteness and comprehensiveness and . . . fidelity.” Indeed, several of the generals depicted in the work (Longstreet, Meade, Hancock, Webb, Hall, and others) vouched for its accuracy—and its pathos. After its first appearance, The Battle of Gettysburg embarked on a cross-country tour with owner, the historian John Badger Bachelder, to “delight and instruct” American audiences. The popularity of the picture and the narrative of the battle of Gettysburg generated a souvenir market including guide books, descriptive keys, and small-scale print reproductions. Bid on this framed print of Walker's masterpiece!

1863 New York Tribune

Donated by the Olde South Ball Committee

Hold a piece of history in your hands with this original 1863 New York Tribune! Front page news includes headlines about things happening in South Carolina, the battle of Chickamauga, the aftermath of Gettysburg and more! Enjoy reading through old advertisements, including one offering the sale of a hoop skirt factory! Take note of the mention of Congressman Clement Vallandigham, an Ohio Copperhead who was arrested for publicly opposing the Northern government's handling of the war. Chuckle at the journalistic style that made no pretense of unbiased reporting and hurled insults freely, referring to some Confederate officers as the "poltroon chevaliers of a spurious aristocracy." Enjoy a peek back in time! 

Vintage Tea Set

Donated by the Olde South Ball Committee

Entertain your friends with a Southern cup of tea in style! This petite and dainty vintage tea set featuring charming roses and elegant gold leaves will grace any party. Included in this set is tea from South Carolina's own Charleston Tea Plantation, the only tea plantation in North America.


Handcrafted Tatted Lace

Donated by Mr. Ernest Shealy

Once again, Mr. Shealy is creating some gorgeous hand-tatted ecru lace especially for the Olde South Ball! Delicate and fairy-like, it will make a lovely accent to a wide variety of projects.


Oils and Salts Relaxer Set

Donated by Celtic Rose Oils


Relax after the ball by diffusing some refreshing Young Living lavender oil! Enjoy some handcrafted luxurious bath salts or foot soaks to fully unwind. Anoint weary muscles with a hand-blended ready-to-use roller bottle of "Pan-Away" blend. The perfect package for rest and relaxation!

Sheer Cotton Fabric

Donated by Kansas Mercantile 

If you've ever wanted to attend an 1860s event in the summer but were deterred by the heat, this beautiful cotton sheer fabric is your chance to make it happen! Sheer dresses were popular in hot climates in the 19th century. Light and breathable (but still modest), sheers are a terrific way to stay cool. This lovely print is perfect for summer activities and is 38 inches wide and 10 yards long.


Gloves and Handkerchief Set

Donated by the Olde South Ball Committee

Accent your Victorian outfits with these two elegant pairs of gloves, ivory for the ball and black for daywear or mourning. Clean, soft, with subtle detailing, and made of kid leather, these are the perfect period-correct touch for the fashion-conscious lady! Included are two delicate handkerchiefs that you can tuck into your reticule. The gloves are approximately size 6-7.

Gloves and Handkerchief Set

Donated by the Olde South Ball Committee

Accent your Victorian outfits with these two elegant pairs of gloves, white for the ball and brown for daywear or mourning. Clean, soft, and made of kid leather, these are the perfect period-correct touch for the fashion-conscious lady! Included are two delicate handkerchiefs that you can tuck into your reticule. The gloves are approximately size 6-7.

Civil War Puzzle

Donated by the Olde South Ball Committee

Enjoy spending time with famous people from the Civil War with this brand new unopened (no missing pieces!) 1500-piece puzzle. Featuring men, women, political figures, military leaders, spies, and more, this puzzle is a great chance to put names and faces together (literally!) and have some family fun learning more about some of the influential people in the Late Unpleasantness.

Peterson's 1861 Reticule

Handcrafted and donated by Asela Hopkins

Tuck your lipstick, tissues, medication or other small articles into this dainty period-correct silk purse. Made from 100% silk yarn and lined in silk fabric, this rich purple reticule is patterned from a crochet silk purse pattern in Peterson’s Magazine from 1861.

Period Correct Makeup

Donated by LBCC Historical 

Get ready for your favorite historical events with reproduction cosmetics made from safe and natural ingredients - no arsenic or other dangerous Victorian ingredients! Pomades, a bottle of exquisitely scented Eau de Cologne, a tin of tinted lip balm, delicate face powder, tiny burnt cloves to darken one's eyebrows with, and more! 

Lion of Atlanta Statue

Donated by Eb Joseph Daniels on behalf of SCV States Rights Gist Camp 1451 

Take a replica Confederate monument home with you with this desktop copy of the Lion of Atlanta! The Lion of Atlanta, sometimes referred to as the Lion of the Confederacy, is a memorial statue found in Georgia’s Historic Oakland Cemetery in Atlanta. Commissioned by the Atlanta Ladies Memorial Association, it serves as a marker for the Unknown Dead in the cemetery’s Confederate Section. The Lion of Atlanta was unveiled and dedicated on Confederate Memorial Day, April 26th, 1894, and remains a centerpiece of the commemorative monuments in the Confederate section of Historic Oakland Cemetery.

Compendium of Dress and Adornment

Donated by Geezerettes Publishing

An outstanding republished compilation of 1860 Civil War fashion magazines with selections from Godey's Lady's Book, Arthur's Magazine, Peterson's Magazine, and Harper's Magazine. Fashion articles and fashion images right at your fingertips! This compendium saves you the trouble of searching for fashion magazines in antique stores by providing a terrific assortment of images and quotes into one handy volume!

The Last Meeting

Donated by John and Rose Marie Favors on behalf of the Newberry County Museum 

This beautiful matted print is Everette Julio's depiction of Generals Lee and Jackson's last meeting during the pre-dawn hours of May 2, 1863, before the Battle of Chancellorsville. After this meeting Jackson led his men on the famous march around the Union troops for a surprise attack in the afternoon. After the successful attack Jackson was accidentally mortally wounded by his own men in the evening.

Julio wanted to be the historian-painter of the South. However, "Last Meeting" turned out to be the artist's first and last heroic Confederate painting. He died in 1879, in debt, without ever selling the painting. After Julio's death, the painting eventually found its way to the American Civil War Museum. 


I Rode With Stonewall & The Beleaguered City

Donated by by the Adam Washington Ballenger Camp #68 SCV


Add to your library with these two informative vintage books. "I Rode With Stonewall" is the memoir of Henry Kyd Douglas, the youngest member of Jackson's staff officers. A friend of Sandie Pendleton's, Douglas began the war as a private and ended by holding the command of the Light Brigade, after a wide and varied experience in the war. First published in 1940, this niche autobiography is an excellent addition to your collection!

"The Beleaguered City" tells the story of the Confederacy's capitol city during the war. Published in 1946, this work, "tells in abundant detail what the people did to amuse themselves, what rumors alternately exalted and depressed them, about what and whom they gossiped, what they found procurable in the black market and what it cost them, what makeshifts they resorted to when staple commodities ran out, [and] what they thought and said (and thought without saying and said without thinking) about the the President's menage and about other more or less illustrious members of their government." Enjoy a look at the war through the eyes of a historian who lived much closer to the conflict than we do.